Deritend – Cult Figures (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

There has been a slew of reunions of late by bands who were an important part of the post-punk and indie landscape and who perhaps didn’t get the recognition that they deserved back in the day. Band such as Candy Opera, Modesty Blaise and delivering their first new music in 40 years, Cult Figures.

I’ve thought long and hard about why this might be the case. Probably, they missed the creative process and live experience. Possibly with the pressure to “make it” no longer an issue, such bands can finally make music for all the right reasions. But I also think that for people of a certain these sonic rebirths are a much-needed breath of fresh air. I don’t want to be that guy who says things like “Music isn’t as good as it used to be,” but people are always going to hanker for the music of their formative years and so with little in the modern musical landscape ticking those boxes for them, these second musical chapters are welcomed with open arms.

And such bands always come back better. Wiser for the intervening years, more experienced as players and writers yet still channelling the same art and energy of those early days. Certainly, Deritend feels both like an album that the band weren’t ready to write back then, being just mere pups, but also one capturing the pop smarts and punk energy that always defined Cult Figures.

As an album, it talks of the past but also is a commentary on the lives of the band members and those of their generation today. It shoots the odd nostalgic glance over its shoulder but is also about renewal and looking to an often uncertain future.

But if it is the lyrical depth and astute observations that keep you coming back to Deritend, it is the music that brings you here in the first place. The fire hasn’t diminished, it just got more discerning, and their ability to pen an infectious tune, one full of groove, swagger and killer riffs has only increased. And then some…

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